Forest management is a branch of forestry concerned with overall administrative, legal, economic, and social aspects, as well as scientific and technical aspects, such as silviculture, protection, and forest regulation.

Quiet Forest

FOREST MANAGEMENT

Many times a client needs the value of his standing timber (also referred to as “stumpage”) appraised. The reasons to do so include selling your timber, a potential property sale or property acquisition, for estate planning, for loan collateral, or for investment planning.

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TIMBER INVENTORY & VALUATION

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Wood

TIMBER SALES ADMINISTRATION

The purpose of timber stand improvement, or TSI, is to free desirable trees from competition, thin the trees to desirable numbers and remove the poorer trees. This improves the overall condition of the stand and concentrates wood growth on a number of selected trees.

Image by Dave Reed

TIMBER STAND IMPROVEMENT

Tree-planting is the process of transplanting tree seedlings, generally for forestry, land reclamation, or landscaping purpose. It differs from the transplantation of larger trees in arboriculture, and from the lower cost but slower and less reliable distribution of tree seeds.

Tree Planting

TREE PLANTING

Sometimes land & forest management involves getting up close & personal to survey individual trees to inform management strategies, to protect against the spread of disease, to mitigate hazards & ensure tree safety.

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TREE FARM INSPECTING

Current Agricultural Use Valuation (CAUV) reduces property taxes through varying rates based on soil types. ... Ohio Forest Tax Law (OFTL) reduces forestland taxes by a 50% rate. The Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Forestry oversees the program.

Aerial View of a Beautiful Property

CAUV / OFTL PLANNING

property tax reduction - CAUV / OFTL

Farmers tend to think that tax planning opportunities are only available in high-income years or when they close on a big transaction (selling your property, selling a large amount of stock for a capital gain, etc). However, just as tax planning is essential in those situations, it is also critical to consider tax planning strategies during a down year. One of the major goals in this scenario is to avoid a tax loss for the year because the new loss rules in effect for farmers are much different than they were before the passage of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017.

The goal for a farmer in a down year should be to avoid a net operating loss and to at least break even. There are a few different tax planning opportunities available to farmers to increase current-year earnings. First, farmers can choose the tax year an insurance claim payment is recognized and counted towards your taxable income. 

Another way to increase taxable income for the year is to try to accelerate the recognition of revenue if the farmer is a cash basis taxpayer. If using the cash basis, income is recognized when cash/payment is received. Therefore, to increase profits for the year, perhaps a farmer could attempt to receive cash payments earlier than previously expected. Issuing a discount to a purchaser to pay for goods before year-end is a simple, but effective way to increase earnings. It’s common for farmers to have existing deferred payment contracts as well. These contracts allow great flexibility in determining which tax year to assign a sale. If the farmer is not able to adjust the timing of revenue, a farmer who uses the cash basis of accounting could also defer expenses (including any potential conservation easement deduction) to 2020 to reduce the amount of the current-year loss.

Because of the complexity of the loss rules and the potential delay to receive any benefit of the loss (if carried forward), farming taxpayers should attempt to avoid generating losses at all costs. 

Forest Management Page

Forestry is bringing back forests

Until the 1920s, forests were often logged and abandoned. Now, across the country, an average of 1.7 billion seedlings are planted annually. That translates into six seedlings planted for every tree harvested. In addition, billions of additional seedlings are regenerated naturally.


Forestry helps water quality

Foresters carefully manage areas called watersheds (areas where we collect our drinking water) and riparian zones (land bordering rivers, streams, and lakes). These are places where maintaining water quality is the primary concern for foresters. Forests actually help to clean water and get it ready for us to drink. The trees, the soil, and bacteria are all part of this process. Forest cover protects and nurtures the soils that are the key to water retention, filtering, and quality.


Forestry offsets air pollution

Foresters nurture forests, which are sometimes called “the gills of the planet.” One mature tree absorbs approximately 13 pounds of carbon dioxide a year. For every ton of wood a forest grows, it removes 1.47 tons of carbon dioxide and replaces it with 1.07 tons of oxygen.


Forestry helps reduce catastrophic wildfires

At the turn of the century, wildfires annually burned across 20 to 50 million acres of the country each year. Through education, prevention, and control, the amount of wildfires has been reduced to about two to five million acres a year–a reduction of 90%. By marking and removing excess fuels, such as underbrush and some trees, foresters can modify forests in order to make them more resilient to fire.


Forestry helps wildlife

Foresters employ a variety of management techniques to benefit wildlife, including numerous endangered species. For example, thinning and harvesting create conditions that stimulate the growth of food sources for wildlife. Openings created by harvesting provide habitat for deer and a variety of songbirds. Thinning can be used to accelerate growth and development of older trees that are favored by owls and other species. In order to enhance salmon habitat, foresters also carry out strategic tree plantings and monitor forest health along streams in order to keep the water cool and reduce sediments.


Forestry provides great places to recreate

Foresters manage forests that provide recreational benefits to communities. Forests are important areas for such recreationists as birdwatchers, hikers, nature photographers, horseback riders, skiers, snowmobilers, and campers. And because foresters put water values high on their list of priorities, the rivers and lakes in forested areas provide such recreational opportunities as fishing, canoeing, and rafting.


Forestry benefits urban environments

Urban foresters manage forests and trees to benefit communities in many ways. Forests in urban areas reduce stormwater runoffs, improve air quality, and reduce energy consumption. For example, three well-placed mature trees around a house can cut air-conditioning costs by 10-50 percent.


Forestry provides renewable and energy-efficient building products

Foresters manage some forests for timber and produce a renewable resource because trees can be replanted. Other building materials, such as steel, iron, and copper, can be reused and recycled but not replaced. Wood is a renewable resource which, in addition to being recyclable, can be produced anew for generations to come on sustainable managed forestlands. Recycling and processing wood products also requires much less energy than does the processing of many other non-renewable materials.
Forestry helps family forests stay intact. – Foresters help family forestland owners, who own 54 percent of all the forests in the US, understand the benefits of managing their forests in an environmentally friendly manner. Better management of private forests means that those forests will remain healthy and productive. Many endangered species spent at least part of their time on private land, more than 80 percent of our nation’s total precipitation falls first on private lands and 70 percent of eastern watersheds run through private lands.


Forestry is good for soils

Foresters and natural resource managers are dependent on forest soils for growing and managing forests and, to a large extent, forest soils are dependent on resource professionals and managers. Foresters’ success in growing forests and producing forest products is dependent on their ability to understand soil properties and to then match species with soils and to prescribe activities that not only promote forest growth but also enhance and protect soil productivity and prevent soil erosion.  – Society of American Foresters

Updated Forest Management Page 

 

Successful forest management needs to start with the landowner’s personal goals. Your list of objectives might include the following: income (for college tuition, farm upkeep, retirement, etc), forest health, deer habitat, trail development, family recreation, tax liability reduction, water quality, erosion control, or just preserving the beauty of a special spot. What matters most about YOUR woods? We would enjoy getting to know you and your land and help out by talking through your options with you.

 

bringing back forests

Until the 1920s, forests were often logged and abandoned. Now, across the country, an average of 1.7 billion seedlings are planted annually. That translates into six seedlings planted for every tree harvested. In addition, billions of additional seedlings are regenerated naturally.


helps water quality

Foresters carefully manage areas called watersheds (areas where we collect our drinking water) and riparian zones (land bordering rivers, streams, and lakes). These are places where maintaining water quality is the primary concern for foresters. Forests actually help to clean water and get it ready for us to drink. The trees, the soil, and bacteria are all part of this process. Forest cover protects and nurtures the soils that are the key to water retention, filtering, and quality.


offsetting air pollution

Foresters nurture forests, which are sometimes called “the gills of the planet.” One mature tree absorbs approximately 13 pounds of carbon dioxide a year. For every ton of wood a forest grows, it removes 1.47 tons of carbon dioxide and replaces it with 1.07 tons of oxygen.


Forestry helps reduce catastrophic wildfires

At the turn of the century, wildfires annually burned across 20 to 50 million acres of the country each year. Through education, prevention, and control, the amount of wildfires has been reduced to about two to five million acres a year–a reduction of 90%. By marking and removing excess fuels, such as underbrush and some trees, foresters can modify forests in order to make them more resilient to fire.


helps wildlife

Foresters employ a variety of management techniques to benefit wildlife, including numerous endangered species. For example, thinning and harvesting create conditions that stimulate the growth of food sources for wildlife. Openings created by harvesting provide habitat for deer and a variety of songbirds. Thinning can be used to accelerate growth and development of older trees that are favored by owls and other species. In order to enhance salmon habitat, foresters also carry out strategic tree plantings and monitor forest health along streams in order to keep the water cool and reduce sediments.


providing great places to recreate

Foresters manage forests that provide recreational benefits to communities. Forests are important areas for such recreationists as birdwatchers, hikers, nature photographers, horseback riders, skiers, snowmobilers, and campers. And because foresters put water values high on their list of priorities, the rivers and lakes in forested areas provide such recreational opportunities as fishing, canoeing, and rafting.


benefits urban environments

Urban foresters manage forests and trees to benefit communities in many ways. Forests in urban areas reduce stormwater runoffs, improve air quality, and reduce energy consumption. For example, three well-placed mature trees around a house can cut air-conditioning costs by 10-50 percent.


provides renewable and energy-efficient building products

Foresters manage some forests for timber and produce a renewable resource because trees can be replanted. Other building materials, such as steel, iron, and copper, can be reused and recycled but not replaced. Wood is a renewable resource which, in addition to being recyclable, can be produced anew for generations to come on sustainable managed forestlands. Recycling and processing wood products also requires much less energy than does the processing of many other non-renewable materials.
Forestry helps family forests stay intact. – Foresters help family forestland owners, who own 54 percent of all the forests in the US, understand the benefits of managing their forests in an environmentally friendly manner. Better management of private forests means that those forests will remain healthy and productive. Many endangered species spent at least part of their time on private land, more than 80 percent of our nation’s total precipitation falls first on private lands and 70 percent of eastern watersheds run through private lands.


Forestry is good for soils

Foresters and natural resource managers are dependent on forest soils for growing and managing forests and, to a large extent, forest soils are dependent on resource professionals and managers. Foresters’ success in growing forests and producing forest products is dependent on their ability to understand soil properties and to then match species with soils and to prescribe activities that not only promote forest growth but also enhance and protect soil productivity and prevent soil erosion.  – Society of American Foresters

Timber Sales Page

 

The primary reason Clum-Daisher Forestry exists is because it can be very complicated and difficult for landowners to sell timber on their own. A harvest is something that many will only experience once or twice in their life time, so one of the main things we do for our clients is support them through the timber sale process. There is no escaping the truth that the “best price” may not be the “best deal” when it comes to harvesting trees. We can help you with the following steps to a successful timber sale:

  • Identify which objectives are most important to you

  • Select the trees for sale and mark them clearly with paint at eye level and at the stump.

  • Prepare bid prospectus, listing the number of trees for sale, average diameter, board footage, etc.

  • Solicit bids for the trees

  • Facilitate contract signing with a high bidder

  • Monitor the sale while it is in progress

  • Ensure that the sale is closed out with the proper Best Management Practices (for example: water bar installation if needed, seeding, appropriate clean-up, etc)

  • Ease your mind. Professional foresters are here to represent and protect your interests.

Randy and Koral have been working in the woods as foresters since 1979 and Keith Daisher has been working alongside them since 2013. We have learned quite a few things along the way and can help determine if you have enough trees for a successful timber sale, keep an eye on timber market fluctuations for you, and help ensure that your forest is well taken care of through the entire harvesting process. We want to make sure that your woods is protected for future generations to come. If this is something you are interested in now or would like to learn about for the future, we would love to help you out.

Are your ownership goals well defined?

  • Wildlife, forest health, recreation

  • College or retirement funds

  • Investment portfolio diversification


What type of management regime best fits your goals?

  • Clearcut, thin, select groups, shelterwood or leave it to grow


Do you have the information you need to make a sound decision on when to sell?

  • Independent timber cruise and appraisal

  • Professional market review

  • Financial maturity of your timber

  • Health and biological maturity of your timber


Will the logger/buyer implement environmental protection practices?

  • Streamside buffers

  • Water quality and seed tree law compliance

  • Litter and petroleum spill cleanup

  • Remain within sale unit boundaries


We address each of the preceding questions and more to ensure that your timber sale experience is the best it can be.

Appraisal: 

 

Many times a client needs the value of his or her standing timber appraised. You may need this if you are selling or buying property, for estate planning,  for loan collateral, or for investment planning.


The value of uncut standing timber is referred to as stumpage and is essentially the price paid at the sawmill less the cost of logging and transportation. After careful measurement of your timber to determine volume, the stumpage is applied to calculate total estimated value. We say estimated value because, most inventories do not involve measurement of every tree because it would be cost prohibitive, with the exception of an extremely high value stand. We rely on the data collected from a timber cruise to be statistically accurate enough to satisfy most needs.


After data is collected and organized, value is determined by research of current market trends of various timber products. Stumpage prices as determined by market reports are used to place value on your timber and a report is produced that will help you understand the value of your timber.

If an appraisal of your timber is what you need, please contact us to discuss how we can help you.